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Kenneth Kaunda and his African humanism

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13 August 2021
The death of Kenneth David Kaunda, also know by the initials “KK”, on 17 June, passed almost unobserved by the great international press. Yet, for those who followed events in Africa in the 1900s, his figure has a great historical value that is worth reflecting on. Indeed, he was the first head of state of Zambia, a political leader who accompanied the process of decolonization at the continental level, along with other prominent figures such as Nelson Mandela (South Africa), Julius Nyerere (Tanzania), Agostinho Neto (Angola), Samora Machel (Mozambique), Robert Mugabe (Zimbabwe) and Sam Nujoma (Namibia) — the only one of the so-called “Founding Fathers” still alive in southern Africa. A leader in the struggle for liberation and President of the United National Independence Party (UNIP) since 1960, Kaunda became President of Zambia after ...

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